Department of Health Annual Report 2016-17

Outcome 3: Sport and Recreation

Page last updated: 19 October 2017

Improved opportunities for community participation in sport and recreation, excellence in high-performance athletes, and protecting the integrity of sport through, investment in sport infrastructure, coordination of Commonwealth involvement in major sporting events, and research and international cooperation on sport issues

Analysis of performance

In 2016-17, the Department continued to work collaboratively with States and Territories, the Australian Sports Commission (ASC) and the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) to ensure a coordinated and consistent approach to sports policy in Australia. The Department developed, implemented and supported initiatives that: connected more Australians to local sporting activities; improved the understanding of and ability to respond to integrity threats to sport; educated athletes about ethical decision-making; and raised awareness of water and snow safety.

These activities have contributed to the Department’s achievements of objectives under Outcome 3 and our Purpose.

Highlights

This icon depicts sporting equipment.

Supporting active communities

Support continued for the ASC’s Play.Sport.Australia. strategy and Sporting Schools program. Over 5,800 schools registered for the Sporting Schools program, offering a fun and supportive environment for school children to participate in sport.
Refer Program 3.1

This icon depicts a trophy and medal.

Preparation for major sporting events

The Department continued to work closely with Commonwealth entities and key stakeholders to lead and coordinate Government support for the 2017 men’s and women’s Rugby League World Cups (co-hosted with New Zealand and Papua New Guinea), and the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games, to help create enjoyable, safe and successful events.
Refer Program 3.1

This icon depicts a shield and sports equipment.

Protecting the integrity of sport in Australia and internationally

In 2017, Australia assumed the chairing role for the Governments’ group for the World Anti-Doping Agency and has strongly promoted global collaboration to fight doping in sport.
Refer Program 3.1

This icon depicts a shield and a bottle with a poison symbol.

Poisons Standard to be updated to include stimulants DMBA and DMHA

To further protect the health and wellbeing of consumers and limit the potential for inadvertent doping violations by athletes, the stimulants 1,3-dimethylbutylamine (DMBA) and 1,5-dimethylhexylamine (DMHA) and similar substances will be included on Schedule 10 of the Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons. This prohibits the sale, supply and use of these substances which have been used in a number of sporting food supplements in recent years.
Refer Program 3.1

Looking ahead

  • Work will continue to submit scheduling applications for new and untested substances prohibited from sport and potentially unsafe for consumers on the Poisons Standard.
  • The Department will contribute to the staging of upcoming major international sporting events to be held in Australia, including:
    • the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games;
    • the Invictus Games 2018; and
    • the 2020 International Cricket Council World Twenty20.
  • The Department is providing support to preliminary work on Football Federation Australia’s possible bid for the rights to host the FIFA 2023 Women’s World Cup.
  • A National Sport Plan is being developed that is intended to be a system wide examination of sport in Australia to strategically position sport into the future. The National Sport Plan will incorporate four key pillars of participation, performance, prevention through physical activity, and integrity.

Purpose, programs and program objectives contributing to Outcome 3

Purpose
Lead and shape Australia’s health and aged care system and sporting outcomes through evidence-based policy, well targeted programs, and best practice regulation.
Increasing participation in sport and recreation
Supporting upcoming major sporting events
Improving water and snow safety
Protecting the integrity of sport
Performance criteria from the 2016-17 Corporate Plan

Program 3.1: Sport and Recreation

The Department met all performance targets related to Program 3.1: Sport and Recreation.

The Department continues to engage with a wide range of stakeholders and interest groups in relation to sports matters, recognising that the system, from grass roots to elite, relies on investment and cooperation from many stakeholders. This includes multiple levels of government, international sporting organisations, international bodies and domestic representative and commercial groups.

In 2016-17, the Department continued to work with State and Territory Governments and the Australian Sports Commission (ASC), to develop and implement initiatives that encourage more Australians to participate in sport. The Department supports the ASC on its implementation of the Play.Sport.Australia. strategy which has a strong focus on connecting adults and children with local community sporting activities. The Government also announced the development of a National Sport Plan to provide a long term strategy for the Australian sporting sector.

The Department continued to provide specific advice and support to a variety of sports stakeholders to address a range of integrity threats, including doping, match-fixing, illicit drug use in sport, and criminal association. In addition, the Department continued working directly with sports to identify specific threats and construct robust internal integrity frameworks. The Department also worked closely with the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) and the ASC on athlete education programs, and with the Therapeutic Goods Administration to improve regulation of substances prohibited from sport.

Australia continues to operate anti-doping arrangements that are considered by many anti-doping experts to be among world’s best practice. Stimulants 1,3-dimethylbutylamine (DMBA) and 1,5-dimethylhexylamine (DMHA) will be listed on Schedule 10 of the Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons to limit the potential for inadvertent doping violations by athletes. Minimising doping in sport boosts community confidence in sporting outcomes and reduces negative health impacts that can be caused through use of performance enhancing substances.

In conjunction with ASADA, the Department developed and launched an e-learning program about ethical decision-making in sport, as well as developed lesson plans on sport integrity for the National Curriculum for Health and Physical Education. Over 600 participants across 55 sports have completed the e-learning program. Almost 90 per cent of participants who completed the feedback questionnaire strongly agreed or agreed that they are now more likely to consider their values and principles when making decisions around sport integrity issues.

Early preparations have also commenced for upcoming major sporting events, assisting to ensure that these events will be enjoyable and safe for athletes and spectators.

The Department has supported the Governments contribution to safer communities through the provision of water and snow safety equipment as well as awareness initiatives and increased support to Surf Life Saving Australia to improve training for life savers.

Increasing participation in sport and recreation

Coordinate across Government to support the development and implementation of strategies and policies to increase participation in sport and physical activity from community to elite level, reduce injury risks and improve health outcomes for people involved in sport, through the provision of information to the community and sport sector, and advice to Government entities.
Source: 2016-17 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p. 82
2016-17 Target2016-17 Result
Strategies and policies developed during 2016-17 encompass sport and population health outcomes, deliver whole-of-government objectives, and are implemented in consultation with stakeholders in a timely manner.The Department, in consultation with relevant stakeholders, continued to develop and implement strategies, policies and programs aimed at increasing participation in sport and physical activity.
Result: Met

In 2016-17, the Department engaged with States and Territories through the Committee of Australian Sport and Recreation Officials to review and update the National Sport and Active Recreation Policy Framework with a new Strategic Agenda and clear roles and responsibilities. The Department also continued to work closely with the Australian Sports Commission on the Play.Sport.Australia. strategy, and the Sporting Schools program.

In May 2017, the Minister for Sport announced the development of a National Sport Plan (the Plan) to assist with understanding Australia’s expectations of the sports sector, and provide a long term strategy for the future of sport in Australia. The Plan will consider participation, performance, prevention through physical activity, and integrity.

Supporting upcoming major sporting events

Well-coordinated preparation across Government entities to facilitate the implementation of strategies and policies, which support the hosting of major international sporting events and achieving legacy benefits in Australia.
Source: 2016-17 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p. 82
2016-17 Target2016-17 Result
Strategies and policies are implemented during 2016-17, in consultation with key stakeholders, which contribute to the Australian Government’s delivery of a safe and secure event for participants and spectators.The Department worked closely with key stakeholders to develop coordination strategies and progress preparations for upcoming major sporting events in Australia.
Result: Met

In 2016-17, the Department worked with other Government entities, event organisers and State and Territory Governments on a number of upcoming major events, including: the men’s and women’s Rugby League World Cups 2017; Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games; Invictus Games 2018; and 2020 International Cricket Council World Twenty20.

In supporting these events, the Department contributed to developing policies and strategies covering a wide array of whole-of-government activity. This included: customs, immigration and biosecurity arrangements; radio communication and spectrum management; anti-doping; legacy, trade and tourism; and security.

Improving water and snow safety

Develop and implement water and snow safety strategies, programs and projects to support a 50% reduction in drowning deaths by 2020.
Source: 2016-17 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p. 83
2016-17 Target2016-17 Result
Water and snow safety programs result in increased water and snow safety awareness – as reported by water and snow safety organisations.The Department continued to develop water and snow safety strategies and supported key organisations to deliver programs and interventions promoting water and snow safety to Australians and international visitors, and to raise awareness of the dangers in aquatic and alpine environments.
Result: Met

Throughout 2016-17, the Department continued to support key participation initiatives and strategies, including water and snow safety organisations and projects to support a 50% reduction in drowning deaths by 2020. These were achieved through: the National Recreation and Safety Program; the Saving Lives in the Water (Element 1 and Element 2) initiative; and the Water Safety: Reduce Drownings initiative.

According to Royal Life Saving Society - Australia’s 2017 Drowning Report (the Report), in 2016-17, 291 people drowned in Australian waterways. This represents an increase of 3% from the previous year.

The Report highlighted the issue of fatal drowning rates amongst males. During the 2015-16 period, 74% of all drowning deaths were males. The Department continues to work with water safety organisations to address the issue of the high rates of males drowning.

A new element in the 2017 Report considered the rates of drowning per 100,000 population. Interim analysis shows an overall 24% reduction in fatal drowning since 2002-03, when compared to population growth per 100,000 over this period. Royal Life Saving Society Australia estimates this reduction equates to approximately 90 deaths averted per year.

As part of the 2015-16 Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook, Surf Life Saving Australia received an additional $10 million over four years to improve volunteer training for Australia’s life savers. Surf Life Saving Australia is using the additional training funding to update training technology, expand the scope of volunteer training, upskill existing trainers and assessors, and expand recruitment.

Protecting the integrity of sport

Implement initiatives and facilitate stakeholder interaction with Government entities to build resilience of sporting organisations and their capacity to deliver integrity measures.
Source: 2016-17 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p. 84
2016-17 Target2016-17 Result
Sports integrity education platforms are developed and supported, including through regular meetings with sporting organisations, State and Territory Governments, industry stakeholders and relevant entities both nationally and internationally.The Department continued to develop and support sports integrity platforms, and build the resilience of Australian sport to integrity threats, through regular interactions with stakeholders.
Result: Met

In 2016-17, five sport integrity network meetings were held with participants drawn from sporting organisations, Commonwealth and State and Territory Governments, regulators, industry and law enforcement.

An e-learning program focussed on ethical decision-making in sport was developed and launched through a joint project with the Department and the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA). The e-learning program provides users with a framework on ethical decision-making, and includes scenarios on doping, illicit drug use, and match-fixing. The Department and ASADA have also developed lesson plans on sports integrity for the National Curriculum for Health and Physical Education.

Over 600 participants across 55 sports have completed the e-learning program. Almost 90% of participants who completed the feedback questionnaire strongly agreed or agreed that they are now more likely to consider their values and principles when making decisions around sport integrity issues.

In August 2016, the Department updated content in the Illicit Drugs in Sport e-learning program. This program assists Australian sporting organisations to educate their members of the harms associated with illicit drug use in sport.

Increased capacity of Australian sporting organisations to address sports integrity issues.
Source: 2016-17 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p. 84
2016-17 Target2016-17 Result
Ongoing assessment of integrity vulnerabilities of priority national sporting organisations and delivery of support for relevant sports integrity initiatives.In 2016-17, the Department completed three sports integrity threat assessments for national sporting organisations.
Result: Met

Sports integrity assessments and ongoing interactions with sporting organisations reinforced the importance of addressing and responding to integrity threats. Direct funding was provided to one sporting organisation (refer case study on p. 105) with specific vulnerabilities to allow the development of a comprehensive integrity framework. The Department continued to collaborate closely with the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission on a range of sports integrity matters.

Protecting the integrity of Australian sport

This image depicts a basketball team training.The National Integrity of Sport Unit (NISU) was formed in 2012 to provide a central coordination point for the protection of Australian sport from rising integrity threats including match-fixing, doping, criminal infiltration and other unethical conduct.

As part of its protection strategy the NISU developed the Sports Integrity Threat Assessment Methodology, drawing on criminal intelligence threat analysis methods, to systematically identify specific integrity threats to individual sports in Australia. To date, 23 sports have been examined, providing an understanding of threats to their integrity and ways to protect it.

One of the sports analysed was Australian basketball, identifying integrity threats, including significant on- and offshore betting markets on Australian basketball competitions. During 2016-17, Health and Basketball Australia joined forces, with support from the Australian Sports Commission, to completely revamp Basketball Australia’s sports integrity framework. The framework addresses issues such as match-fixing, doping and illicit drug use, as well as promoting best practice in the application of sports science and sports medicine. Education and communication activities were central to ensuring the Australian basketball community was aware of the new framework and its obligations. This framework also provides a model for other sports, nationally and internationally.

Protecting the integrity of Australian sport means we can be confident our sport comprises fair and honest performances and outcomes. Positive conduct by athletes, administrators, officials, supporters and other stakeholders, on and off the sporting arena, maintains the reputation and standing of sport overall.

Delivery of internationally compliant Australian anti-doping arrangements.
Source: 2016-17 Health Portfolio Budget Statements, p. 84
2016-17 Target2016-17 Result
Australian anti-doping arrangements are compliant with the World Anti-Doping Code, and address doping in the contemporary sports environment.Australia’s anti-doping arrangements comply with the World Anti-Doping Code, and address doping in the contemporary sports environment.
Result: Met

In 2016-17, the Department continued to support the operation of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA), and the integrity of sport by combating doping in sport.

In addition, the Department supported the Minister for Sport in discharging responsibilities in relation to anti-doping, including through:

  • tabling of the Government’s response to the recommendations from the 2013 Senate Inquiry into the Practice of Sports Science;
  • enhancing collaboration by WADA Public Authorities including hosting a meeting in Montreal on 16 May 2017;
  • facilitating the Australian Government’s involvement at the WADA Executive and Foundation Board meetings;
  • working with the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science to sustain the operation of Australia’s WADA-accredited testing laboratory; and
  • managing administrative processes that support the application of Australia’s anti-doping legislation (for example, appointments, amendments to legislation).

Performance criteria from the 2016-17 Corporate Plan

Major international sporting events including the Rugby League World Cup 2017 and Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games are supported by Australian Government agencies in the planning and delivery phases.
Source: 2016-17 Department of Health Corporate Plan, p. 26
Refer to performance criterion addressing major international sporting events supported by the Australian Government.
Improved water safety outcomes in Australia.
Source: 2016-17 Department of Health Corporate Plan, p. 26
Refer to performance criterion addressing water safety outcomes.
WADA identifies Australia’s anti-doping arrangements as consistent with the principles of the World Anti-Doping Code, as required by the Convention.
Source: 2016-17 Department of Health Corporate Plan, p. 26
Refer to performance criterion addressing Australia’s anti-doping arrangements.

Outcome 3 – Budgeted expenses and resources

Budget
estimate
2016-17
$’000
(A)
Actual
2016-17
$’000
(B)
Variation
$’000
(B) - (A)
Program 3.1: Sport and Recreation1
Administered expenses
Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1)218,47519,466991
Special Accounts
Sport and Recreation407298(109)
Departmental expenses
Departmental appropriation37,1268,2051,079
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year4715903188
Total for Program 3.126,72328,8722,149
Outcome 3 totals by appropriation type
Administered expenses
Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1)218,47519,466991
Special Accounts407298(109)
Departmental expenses
Departmental appropriation37,1268,2051,079
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year4715903188
Total expenses for Outcome 326,72328,8722,149
Average staffing level (number)49512

Note: Budget estimate represents estimated actual from 2017-18 Health Portfolio Budget Statements.

  1. This program excludes National Partnership payments to State and Territory Governments by the Treasury as part of the Federal Financial Relations (FFR) Framework.
  2. Re-allocation of $0.95m from Program 2.3 to Program 3.1 agreed by Department of Finance.
  3. Departmental appropriation combines ‘Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act No. 1)’ and ‘Revenue from independent sources (s74)’.
  4. Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year are made up of depreciation expense, amortisation, make good expense, operating losses and audit fees.