Department of Health Annual Report 2016-17

References

Page last updated: 19 October 2017

  1. After collection, a cord blood unit is processed and a sample sent for tissue typing. The unit is considered ‘banked’ when it has been recorded and placed in cryogenic storage. The unit is considered ‘searchable’ when the tissue typing information is recorded, all regulatory requirements met and it is available for use by patients.
  2. Delayed cord clamping is when a baby’s umbilical cord is not clamped or cut until it has stopped pulsing or until the placenta has been delivered.
  3. Several Territories are considered as covered under the National Blood Agreement. Further information on covered Territories is available at: National Blood Authority Act 2003
  4. Source: Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care Annual Report 2015-16.
  5. Lew et al. 2017. Long-term evaluation of benefits, harms, and cost-effectiveness of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program in Australia: a modelling study. Lancet Public Health 2017; 2: e331–4
  6. Source: AIHW National Mortality Database, calendar years 1998–2015 (which is the most up-to-date data available) and includes jurisdictions for which data are available and of sufficient quality to publish (NSW, Qld, WA, SA and NT combined). Note that this data is reported on a calendar year basis, reflecting the ABS mortality data collection and publication processes. Estimated result is based on preliminary data that will not be finalised until 2018.
  7. 2015 data, due to the time lag in ABS mortality data publication.
  8. This is contextual data and is listed to provide comparison.
  9. Ibid.
  10. Source: AIHW National Mortality Database, calendar years 1998-2015 (which is the most up-to-date data available) and includes jurisdictions for which data are available and of sufficient quality to publish (NSW, Qld, WA, SA and NT combined). Note that this data is reported on a calendar year basis, reflecting the ABS mortality data collection and publication processes. Estimated result is based on a preliminary data that will not be finalised until 2018.
  11. 2015 data, due to the time lag in ABS mortality data publication.
  12. This is contextual data and is listed to provide comparison.
  13. Ibid.
  14. Based on self-reported data which is likely to underestimate the prevalence of diabetes as it cannot include people with undiagnosed diabetes.
  15. Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2013. Australian Health Survey: biomedical results for chronic diseases, 2011–12. ABS cat. no. 4364.0.55.005. Canberra: ABS.
  16. Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016. Australia’s health 2016. Australia’s health series no. 15. Cat. no. AUS 199. Canberra: AIHW.
  17. Available at: the Health Workforce Data website
  18. Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics 2001 and 2011 Census of Population and Housing.
  19. Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016. Australia’s health 2016. Australia’s health series no. 15. Cat. no. AUS 199. Canberra: AIHW.
  20. Available at: the Eat For Health website
  21. AIHW 2017. National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: monitoring report 2017. Cancer series no. 103. Cat. no. CAN 103. Canberra: AIHW.
  22. AIHW 2016. National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: monitoring report 2016. Cancer series no. 98. Cat. no. CAN 97. Canberra: AIHW.
  23. Figures used in the 2015-16 Department of Health Annual Report are not aligned to the data published on the AIHW website. The correct figures are provided here and are sourced using the AS rate on the AIHW website
  24. Figures used in the 2014-15 Department of Health Annual Report are not aligned to the data published on the AIHW website. The correct figures are provided here and are sourced using the AS rate on the AIHW website
  25. Available at: the Department of Health website
  26. Available at: the Positive Choices: Drug and Alcohol Education - Get informed, stay smart, stay safe website
  27. Available at: National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) 2016—key findings
  28. In line with the monitoring of progress against the 2018 Council of Agreement Governments performance benchmark for tobacco in the general population, results reported under this target have been amended to show age-standardised data sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics National Health Survey (NHS). Updated information from the next NHS is expected to be available in 2018-19.
  29. Results from 2007-08 to 2014-15 as reported under this target in the Department’s 2015-16 Annual Report were also sourced from the NHS. However, age-standardised rates were not reported under this target in the 2015-16 Annual Report.
  30. The Department also monitors and reports on smoking prevalence in the general population using data from the National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS). Data from the NDSHS showed that daily smoking prevalence among those aged 18 years and older in the general population declined from 13.3% in 2013 to 12.8% in 2016. This change was not statistically significant.
  31. Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2017. Cancer in Australia 2017. Cancer series no.101. Cat. no. CAN 100. Canberra: AIHW.
  32. Ibid.
  33. Ibid.
  34. The alcohol risk data presented here are reported against guideline 1 and guideline 2 of The Australian guidelines to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol released in March 2009 by the National Health and Medical Research Council.
  35. Source: National Drug Strategy Household Survey 2016 – key findings.
  36. Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2017. Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2015-16. Drug treatment series no. 29. Cat. no. HSE 187. Canberra: AIHW.
  37. Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016. Estimates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, June 2011. ABS cat. no. 3238.0.55.001. Canberra: ABS.
  38. Available at: the Department of Health website
  39. Available at: the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) website
  40. Ibid.
  41. Refer Appendix 1: Processes Leading to PBAC Consideration – Annual Report for 2016-17 for more information.
  42. Available at: the Department of Health website
  43. Available at: the Department of Health website
  44. Available at: the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority website
  45. Available at: the Therapeutic Goods Administration website
  46. Available at: the Database of TGA laboratory testing results page
  47. Available at: the Federal Register of Legislation website
  48. This figure was published incorrectly in the Department of Health Annual Report 2015-16 and has now been updated to reflect the correct result.
  49. Available at: the Office of the Gene Technology Regulator website
  50. Available at: the Department of Health website
  51. Available at: the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System website
  52. Vector control is any method to limit or eradicate the mammals,birds, insects or other arthropods which transmit disease pathogens.
  53. There has been a change to the counting methodology used for 2016-17 due to comprehensive CHSP data now available through the Data Exchange (DEX).
  54. People surveyed include providers of care for, and the families of, people living with dementia.
  55. Ibid.
  56. Available at: the Ageing and Aged Care website
  57. Excluding the Secretary, Holder of Public Office and the Chief Medical Officer. Senior Executive Service (SES) staff and equivalent comprise SES Band 1-3 and Medical Officers 5-6. Executive Level (EL) Staff and equivalent comprise EL 1-2, Medical Officers 2-4, Legal 1-2, Public Affairs 3, Senior Principal Research Scientist and Principal Research Scientist.
  58. The Department has implemented the Australian Government Guidelines on the Recognition of Sex and Gender and made changes to the Human Resource Management System to enable collection of non-binary gender. At 30 June 2017, no staff has self-identified as non-binary.
  59. The majority of the 2016-17 decrease in staffing numbers from 2015-16 can be attributed to the Voluntary Redundancy Program.
  60. This table includes the head count figures of all staff by State and Territory as at 30 June 2017, including staff on leave, secondment and outposted staff.
  61. Excludes payments made on termination, including employee entitlements and separations.
  62. Any employee who held a substantive SES or equivalent position during 2016-17 is represented as one (1).
  63. Excludes payments made on termination, including employee entitlements and separations.
  64. Also includes employees who have been provided with higher duties in 2016-17.
  65. Data was published in December 2016 and represents performance in the 2015-16 financial year.
  66. Available at: the Treasury website
  67. Available at: the Australian National Audit Office website
  68. Available at: the Australian National Audit Office website
  69. Available at: the Australian National Audit Office website
  70. Available at: the Australian National Audit Office website
  71. Available at: the Australian National Audit Office website
  72. Available at: the Australian National Audit Office website
  73. Available at: the Australian National Audit Office website
  74. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, National Drug Strategy Household Survey 2016 key findings.
  75. The costs reported cover only the amount paid to the organisation and not the cost of postage or production of the material sent out. Where a creative agency or direct marketing agency has been used to create the direct mail materials, the amount paid to the agency is reported here.
  76. Figures do not take into account extended meetings where two or more drugs are discussed within one meeting date.
  77. Figures do not take into account extended meetings where two or more drugs are discussed within one meeting date.
  78. Available at: the Strategic Consultative Committee (SCC) - NICNAS website
  79. Available at: the Strategic Consultative Committee (SCC) - NICNAS website