Online version of the 2013-14 Department of Health Annual Report

Outcome 1: Population Health

A reduction in the incidence of preventable mortality and morbidity in Australia, including through regulation and national initiatives that support healthy lifestyles and disease prevention

Page last updated: 17 July 2019

Major Achievements

  • The Australian Government has committed to developing a new National Diabetes Strategy to inform how existing resources can be better coordinated and targeted across all levels of Government. The Strategy will focus Australia’s response to diabetes management on the key areas of prevention and primary health care, and will help to identify ways to lessen the impact of the disease through early diagnosis, management and treatment.
  • The Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA) has been closed with all essential ongoing functions and employees transferred to the Department of Health. This streamlines and better coordinates preventive health efforts within the Commonwealth health portfolio.
  • Smoking rates have fallen significantly for Australians. For people aged 14 years or older the daily smoking rate has dropped from 15.1% in 2010 to 12.8% in 2013 and for people aged 18 years or older the daily smoking rate has dropped from 15.9% in 2010 to 13.3% in 2013. This is almost half the 1991 rate of 24.3% (14 years or older) and 25.0% (18 years or older). These results demonstrate that Australia’s comprehensive range of tobacco control measures, supported by successive Governments at the Commonwealth and State level, are effective. This will lead to reductions in death and disease caused by smoking.
  • The National Cervical Screening Program has been highly successful, with reductions of 50% in cervical cancer incidence and deaths since its introduction over 20 years ago. A review of the latest scientific evidence regarding cervical cancer, screening and new technologies has been completed and recommendations will be considered by Australian, State and Territory Governments.
  • From 1 July 2013 the Department has invited people turning 60 to undertake free screening through the National Bowel Cancer Screening Programme. The addition of 60 year olds meant more than 1.2 million people were invited to screen in 2013-14, potentially detecting more than 2,600 cancerous lesions.
  • The Department worked with key stakeholders to develop the new National Blood-Borne Viruses (BBV) and Sexually Transmissible Infections (STI) Strategies 2014-2017. These Strategies set the direction and guide Australia’s response to HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, STI and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander BBV and STI for 2014-2017.
  • The National Immunisation Strategy was completed in 2013-14, articulating the vision for action over the next five years (2013-2018) for the National Immunisation Program (NIP). The Strategy will improve immunisation coverage rates, particularly for areas with low coverage rates; continue to address vaccine safety concerns; ensure secure supply of vaccine for Australia into the future; and improve utilisation of data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) and the National Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Program Register to monitor and evaluate programme outcomes, vaccine efficacy and safety.
  • In 2013-14, the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) launched the Medicine Shortages Information Initiative, a partnership between Medicines Australia, the Generic Medicines Industry Association and the TGA.

Challenges

  • Despite ongoing measures to promote prevention of transmission, new diagnoses of HIV in Australia increased by almost 10% in 2012 (1,253 cases diagnosed, compared to 1,137 in 2011). The 2012 figure was the largest number of new diagnoses per year for 20 years. New diagnoses in 2013 were slightly lower (1,236 cases) than 2012. Similarly, rates of gonorrhoea (13,649 cases in 2012) and syphilis (1,534 cases in 2012) have increased substantially, with syphilis rates close to the highest rates ever recorded in Australia. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continue to be over-represented in notifications of STI and viral hepatitis.
  • The inclusion of targets for the first time in the 2014-2017 National BBV and STI Strategies provides a renewed focus for action and a framework for accountability to address rates of HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, STI, and BBV and STI in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Meeting the targets will be a considerable challenge for the Department and all partners to the Strategies: requiring the concerted effort of all governments, affected communities, health care providers, the community sector and researchers. All partners, through the development and implementation of the Implementation and Evaluation Plan, have committed to achieving the targets.
  • Immunisation coverage rates for children in Australia are high, with over 90% of children fully immunised at one, two and five years of age. However, there are some pockets of low immunisation coverage which may compromise immunity in these communities. The Department will work with States and Territories, through the National Partnership Agreement on Essential Vaccines, and with immunisation providers, to improve immunisation rates in pockets of low coverage and reduce vaccine refusal. While immunisation coverage rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are comparable to all children at two and five years of age, further work is required to raise Indigenous coverage at one year of age as it lags 5-6% behind the average.

Looking Ahead

In 2014-15, the Department will reduce preventable disease by implementing the National BBV and STI Strategies; developing a new National Diabetes Strategy; providing a range of cancer screening services, including fast-tracking the full implementation of biennial bowel screening for all Australians aged 50 to 74; further improving Australia’s already high immunisation rates; and delivering programmes and communication campaigns aimed at discouraging the use and misuse of alcohol, tobacco, and prescription and illicit drugs.

Programmes Contributing to Outcome 1

  • Programme 1.1: Prevention, early detection and service improvement
  • Programme 1.2: Communicable disease control
  • Programme 1.3: Drug strategy
  • Programme 1.4: Regulatory policy
  • Programme 1.5: Immunisation
  • Programme 1.6: Public health

Divisions Contributing to Outcome 1

In 2013-14, Outcome 1 was the responsibility of Population Health Division, Best Practice Regulation and Deregulation Division, Primary and Mental Health Care Division, the Office of Health Protection, the Office of the Gene Technology Regulator, the Therapeutic Goods Administration, and the National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme.

Outcome Strategy

Outcome 1 aims to reduce the incidence of preventable mortality and morbidity throughout Australia by tackling lifestyle factors associated with chronic illness, detecting disease earlier when it does occur, and reducing the spread of infectious disease. In 2013-14 the Department worked to achieve this Outcome by managing initiatives under the programmes outlined below.

Programme 1.1: Prevention, early detection and service improvement

Programme 1.1 aims to reduce the incidence of chronic disease by encouraging Australians to lead healthy lifestyles, supporting early detection and prevention of cancer and improving chronic disease management.

Reduce the incidence of chronic disease and promote healthier lifestyles; and improve palliative care in Australia

Chronic disease is responsible for a significant portion of disease burden in Australia. The Department undertakes a range of activities to reduce this burden from diseases including diabetes and asthma.

The Department also funds a range of national palliative care projects to enhance the quality of palliative care service delivery and increase support for people who are dying, their families and carers.

Qualitative Deliverable
Undertake grant funding and procurement processes as required to meet the objectives of the Chronic Disease Prevention and Service Improvement Fund
2013-14 Reference Point
Negotiation and execution of appropriate funding contracts and funding agreements to be completed by June 2014, to enable funding to commence from 2014-15
Result
Met
Qualitative KPI
Effective implementation of the Chronic Disease Prevention and Service Improvement Fund activities
2013-14 Reference Point
Regular progress reports on key milestones from contracted organisations indicate that activities are being implemented effectively in accordance with contractual arrangements
Result
Met

Support early detection and prevention of cancer

Bowel Cancer Screening

Bowel cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in Australia. Screening using faecal occult blood tests can detect asymptomatic early bowel cancers and precancers when treatment is more effective and lives are saved.

Qualitative Deliverable
Implement the expansion of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program to invite Australians turning 60 years of age
2013-14 Reference Point
Invitations to commence 1 July 2013
Result
Met
The National Bowel Cancer Screening Program has previously provided screening to people turning 50, 55 and 65. From July 2013 the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program was expanded and the Department commenced sending invitations to 60 year olds to undertake screening.
In the 2014-15 Budget the Australian Government committed to further expand the program to a biennial screening interval by 2020 for people aged 50-74 years. From 2015, people turning 70 and 74 years will also be invited to commence screening through the program.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of people invited to take part in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program who participated9
2013-14 Target
41.0%
2013-14 Actual
Data not available
Result
Data not available
As there is a time lag between an invitation being sent, test results and collection of data from registries, participation rates for 2013 and 2014 are not yet available.
Breast Cancer Screening

Since the introduction of BreastScreen Australia in 1991, there has been a reduction in breast cancer mortality in women 50 to 69 years of age of 36.5 per cent.10 This is attributable to early detection through screening and advances in the management and treatment of breast cancer. The BreastScreen Australia Evaluation Report 2009 found a 25 per cent decrease in mortality was directly attributable to screening.

In Australia, five-year survival rates from breast cancer have increased from 72 per cent between 1982-1987 to 89 per cent between 2006-2010.11

Qualitative Deliverable
Implement outcomes of the review of BreastScreen Australia’s accreditation system
2013-14 Reference Point
Completed by June 2014
Result
Met
The Department has reviewed the BreastScreen Australia Programme’s accreditation system, including the 173 National Accreditation Standards, to streamline the system while maintaining quality of services.
Qualitative Deliverable
Implement the expansion of BreastScreen Australia to invite Australian women 70-74 years of age
2013-14 Reference Point
Invitations to commence early 2014
Result
Met
In 2013-14, the Department established National Partnership Agreements with State and Territory Governments to fund the expansion of BreastScreen Australia’s target age range from women 50-69 to women 50-74 years of age. Most States and Territories commenced screening additional women throughout 2013-14.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of women 50-69 years of age participating in the BreastScreen Australia Program12
2013-14 Target
55.2%
2013-14 Actual
Data not available
Result
Data not available
The percentage of women 50-69 years of age participating in the BreastScreen Australia Program: 2010-11 54.6 per cent, 2011-12 54.6 per centAs there is a time lag between an invitation being sent, test results and collection of data from registries, participation rates for 2013 and 2014 are not yet available.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of women 70-74 years of age participating in the programme
2013-14 Target
41.0%
2013-14 Actual
Data not available
Result
Data not available
Cervical Cancer Screening

In 2013-14, the Department continued work in the areas of early detection and prevention of cervical cancer through the National Cervical Screening Program. Since the introduction of this programme in 1991, there has been a 50 per cent reduction in deaths from cervical cancer.13

A review of cervical screening policy was completed in June 2014. The review has resulted in recommendations to replace the Pap smear with a new cervical screening test. The new cervical screening test detects human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and has been found to be more effective, and just as safe, as the Pap smear. Recommendations from the review are being considered by Government.

Quantitative KPI
Percentage of women in the target age group participating in the National Cervical Screening Program14
2013-14 Target
58.6%
2013-14 Actual
Data not available
Result
Data not available
As there is a time lag between an invitation being sent, test results and collection of data from registries, participation rates for 2013 and 2014 are not yet available.

Chronic disease management and support

Development of the National Diabetes Strategy commenced in 2013 with the establishment of the terms of reference for a National Diabetes Advisory Group and appointment of co-chairs to progress its development. The Advisory Group is working with key stakeholders to consider: approaches to diabetes services and care; the role of Governments and other stakeholders in diabetes care and management; and to consider where efforts and investments are currently being made and how well these match needs. The Strategy will provide a framework for the future in terms of prevention, detection, management and research efforts for diabetes. The Strategy is due to be finalised in 2015.

Qualitative Deliverable
Oversee implementation of the Diabetes Care Project pilot to test a more comprehensive, patient-centred approach to improve the care of patients with diabetes
2013-14 Reference Point
Implementation of the Diabetes Care Project pilot in identified sites across three states –Queensland, South Australia and Victoria
Result
Met
The implementation of the Diabetes Care Project pilot ended on 28 February 2014, with the evaluation commencing on 1 March 2014. The pilot is testing new models of healthcare delivery designed to improve care for adults with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
Quantitative KPI
Number of patients enrolled in the Diabetes Care Project15
2013-14 Target
7,500
2013-14 Actual
5,651
Result
Substantially met
The initial patient enrolment target (7,500) was achieved. By the end of the project a number of patients had withdrawn due to factors which included relocating out of the region, but the final number of patients (5,651) was sufficient for evaluation purposes.

Programme 1.2: Communicable disease control

Programme 1.2 aims to reduce the incidence of blood borne viruses and sexually transmissible infections.

Reduce the incidence of blood-borne viruses and sexually transmissible infections

In 2013-14 the Department supported education and prevention activities to reduce the incidence of blood-borne viruses (BBV) and sexually transmissible infections (STI). These activities aim to improve knowledge, attitudes and behaviours among target groups including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, culturally and linguistically diverse Australians, youth, people in rural and regional areas, and people who inject drugs.

Qualitative Deliverable
Undertake grant funding and procurement processes as required to meet the objectives of the Communicable Disease Prevention and Service Improvement Grant fund
2013-14 Reference Point
Negotiation of new funding contracts and funding agreements to be completed by June 2014, to enable funding to commence from 2014-15
Result
Substantially met
Deeds of variation to the 2013-14 funding agreements under the Communicable Disease Prevention and Service Improvement Grant fund are being undertaken to secure funding until the end of 2014. Future funding will align activities under the fund with the National BBV and STI Strategies 2014-17.
Qualitative Deliverable
Undertake priority actions contained in the National BBVs and STIs Strategies 2010-2013
2013-14 Reference Point
Have completed or commenced the relevant national priority actions contained in the National BBV and STI Strategies 2010-2013 by the end of 2013
Result
Substantially met
The majority of the priority actions contained in the 2010-2013 National BBV and STI Strategies have commenced and/or been completed. These include the development of a hepatitis B testing policy to guide health professionals on the testing and treatment of people with hepatitis B and increasing the focus on BBVs and STIs issues within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health sector.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of laboratory tests which are positive for chlamydia infection
2013-14 Target
<12%
2013-14 Actual
7.3%
Result
Met
As over 80% of chlamydia infection notifications are amongst people aged 15-29 years, the Department continues to support promotion of sexually transmissible infection testing which enables early detection and treatment, and reduces the longer term complications that can be associated with untreated chlamydia.
Quantitative KPI
Number of newly diagnosed cases of hepatitis C infection16
2013-14 Target
<12,250
2013-14 Actual
10,856
Result
Met
Qualitative KPI
Provide funding to non-government organisations under the Communicable Disease Prevention and Service Improvement Grants Fund to support programmes which are effective in reducing the spread of communicable disease
2013-14 Reference Point
Organisations funded in accordance with the priorities outlined in the National BBV and STI Strategies 2010-2013
Regular progress reports on key milestones from contracted organisations indicate that activities are being implemented effectively in accordance with contractual arrangements
Result
Met
Priority actions contained in the 2010-2013 National BBV and STI Strategies have been implemented by non-government organisations representing communities affected by HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and sexually transmissible infections. Funds have supported education and awareness programmes to increase testing and treatment, and to provide information on prevention measures.

Programme 1.3: Drug strategy

Programme 1.3 aims to reduce the harmful effects of tobacco use, and reduce the harm caused to individuals and communities from excessive alcohol consumption and illicit drug use.

Reduce the harmful effects of tobacco use

In 2013-14, compliance and enforcement activities under the Tobacco Plain Packaging Act 2011 continued. The Department is required to report on contraventions of the Tobacco Plain Packaging Act 2011. The 2013-14 report is included under Part 3.2 of this Annual Report.

During 2013-14, the Department, along with the Attorney-General’s Department and the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, continued to defend the tobacco plain packaging legislation against international challenges.

The Department continues to run social marketing campaigns to raise awareness of the dangers of smoking and encourage attempts to quit among high risk and hard to reach populations.

Qualitative Deliverable
Implement social marketing campaigns to raise awareness of the dangers of smoking and encourage and support attempts to quit
2013-14 Reference Point
Deliver the National Tobacco Campaign – More Targeted Approach within agreed timeframes
Result
Met
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of population 18 years of age and over who are daily smokers17
2013-14 Target
15.2%
2013-14 Actual
13.3%
Result
Met
Smoking rates in Australia continue to fall. For people aged 18 years or over the daily smoking rate has fallen significantly to 13.3% in 2013, from 15.9% in 2010, 17.5% in 2007, 18.2% in 2004 and 20.0% in 2001.18

Reduce harm to individuals and communities from excessive alcohol consumption and use of illicit drugs

The Australian Government continues to work with the States and Territories to reduce the harms caused by excessive alcohol consumption and use of illicit drugs. In 2013-14 work has focused on the emergence of new psychoactive substances, pharmaceutical misuse and alcohol related harms.

The Government has also sought to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the alcohol and other drug sectors by reviewing Government funded organisations and treatment services.

Qualitative Deliverable
Undertake grant funding and procurement processes as required to meet the objectives of the Substance Misuse Prevention and Service Improvement Grants Fund
2013-14 Reference Point
Negotiation and execution of appropriate funding contracts and funding agreements to be completed by June 2014, to enable funding to commence from 2014-15
Result
Met
Qualitative Deliverable
Fund and support drug and alcohol treatment services to strengthen the capacity of service providers across Australia
2013-14 Reference Point
Regular progress reports on key milestones from contracted organisations indicate that activities are being implemented effectively in accordance with contractual arrangements
Result
Met
Qualitative Deliverable
Provide up-to-date information to young people on the risks and harms of illicit drug use
2013-14 Reference Point
Dissemination of materials and delivery of the National Drugs Campaign and providing information through the National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre on the risks and harms associated with cannabis use
Result
Met
Qualitative KPI
Availability of prevention and early intervention substance misuse resources for teachers, parents and students
2013-14 Reference Point
Enhanced access to materials on the National Drugs Campaign website19
Result
Met
A range of factual information resources were developed in 2013-14 for teachers, parents and students which are available on the National Drugs Campaign website. Work also commenced on the development of an online portal to deliver information and programmes to prevent alcohol and drug misuse and harms among students.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of population 14 years of age and older recently (in the last 12 months) using an illicit drug
2013-14 Target
<13.4%
2013-14 Actual
15.0% (2013 data)
Result
Not Met
The National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NDSHS) is undertaken every three years and is the primary data source used to report on this KPI. Results from the most recent NDSHS, undertaken in 2013, show that 15.0% of people aged 14 years and older reported using an illicit drug in the past 12 months. This compares to previous results of 14.7% in 2010, and 13.4% in 2007.

Programme 1.4: Regulatory policy

Programme 1.4 aims to provide direction and national leadership in food and gene technology regulatory policy issues, maintain and improve the therapeutic goods regulatory framework, and provide for the safe and sustainable use of industrial chemicals.

Food regulation policy

Develop food standards and food regulatory policy

Food standards and regulatory policy ensure the health of Australian consumers is protected and supported by a safe food supply. In 2013-14, the Department continued to undertake activities to support the development of food standards, and food regulation, policy and advice. This involved working with stakeholders including industry representatives, public health representatives, Food Standards Australia New Zealand, States and Territories.

Qualitative Deliverable
Develop an interpretive front-of-pack labelling system for foods
2013-14 Reference Point
New labelling system developed by June 2014
Result
Met
Qualitative Deliverable
Develop advice and policy for the Australian Government on food regulatory issues
2013-14 Reference Point
Relevant, evidence-based advice produced in a timely manner
Result
Met
Qualitative KPI
Promote a nationally consistent approach to food policy and regulation
2013-14 Reference Point
Consistent regulatory approach across Australia through nationally agreed policy and standards
Result
Met

Therapeutic Goods

Ensure that therapeutic goods are safe, effective and of high quality

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) ensures the quality, safety and efficacy of therapeutic goods in Australia. In 2013-14, the TGA continued to regulate therapeutic goods under a national framework, using a risk based approach. Assessment and monitoring were carried out to ensure therapeutic goods available in Australia were of an acceptable standard, and manufactured in accordance with the principles of Good Manufacturing Practice. This included assessment of annual reports from sponsors of Class III and active implantable devices, following inclusion in the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG).20 At the same time, the TGA continued to ensure that the community had access, within a reasonable timeframe, to therapeutic advances.

In 2013-14, the TGA launched the Medicine Shortages Information Initiative (a partnership between Medicines Australia, the Generic Medicines Industry Association and the TGA). As part of this initiative, the TGA website provides health professionals and consumers with information on prescription medicines that are registered in the ARTG and are either currently or anticipated to be in short supply whether temporarily or permanently (ie discontinued).

Quantitative KPI
Percentage of alleged breaches received that are assessed within 10 working days and an appropriate response initiated
2013-14 Target
100%
2013-14 Actual
100%
Result
Met
The TGA assessed all alleged breaches of the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 within 10 working days and initiated appropriate responses in 100% of the instances notified.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of evaluations and appeals regarding the entry of therapeutic goods onto the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods made within legislated timeframes21
2013-14 Target
100%
2013-14 Actual
100%
Result
Met
The percentage of evaluations and appeals regarding the entry of therapeutic goods onto the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods made within legislated timeframes: 2010-11 97 per cent, 2011-12 96 per cent, 2012-13 100 per cent The TGA completed all 27 internal reviews under section 60 of the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 regarding the entry of therapeutic goods onto the ARTG within legislated timeframes.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of prescription medicine evaluations completed within target timeframes:
2013-14 Target
Category 1 100%
2013-14 Actual
99.8%
Result
Met
2013-14 Target
Category 3 100%
2013-14 Actual
100%
Result
Met
The percentage of prescription medicine evaluations completed within target timeframes: Category 1 - 2010-11 99.4 per cent, 2011-12 99.5 per cent, 2012-13 99.7 per cent; Category 2 - 2010-11 99.8 per cent, 2011-12 99.4 per cent, 2012-13 100 per cent In 2013-14:
  • 435 of 436 Category 1 evaluations for prescription medicines were completed within the legislated timeframe of 255 days; and
  • All 1,546 Category 3 evaluations for prescription medicines were completed within the legislated timeframe of 45 days.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of licensing and surveillance inspections22 completed within target timeframes:
2013-14 Target
Domestic 100%
2013-14 Actual
66%
Result
Not Met
2013-14 Target
Overseas 90%
2013-14 Actual
58%
Result
Not Met
The percentage of prescription medicine evaluations completed within target timeframes: Domestic - 2010-11 87 per cent, 2011-12 69 per cent, 2012-13 73 per cent; Overseas - 2010-11 82 per cent, 2011-12 60 per cent, 2012-13 71 per cent In 2013-14:
  • 132 of 201 inspections of Australian manufacturers were completed within target timeframes; and
  • 66 of 113 inspections of overseas manufacturers were completed within target timeframes.

The TGA has directed efforts to raising levels of compliance by manufacturers. The higher the compliance level, the less oversight is required by TGA, meaning less frequent inspections of those manufacturers and an ability to focus more effort on less compliant manufacturers. Investing greater effort into achieving voluntary compliance has impacted on TGA’s ability to conduct inspections within target timeframes. TGA has ensured the health and safety of consumers by conducting risk assessments and giving priority to inspecting high risk manufacturing processes.

Implement the TGA Reform Blueprint

In 2013-14, the TGA made significant progress in delivering a number of reforms in accordance with the detailed plan – Delivering reforms – Implementation plan for TGA Reforms: A blueprint for TGA's future.23

Qualitative Deliverable
Implement reforms that enhance TGA’s current regulatory processes
2013-14 Reference Point
Reforms implemented in accordance with the published plan
Result
Substantially met
Activity during 2013-14 included:
  • development of an electronic Common Technical Document (eCTD) Review tool, which will enable validation, review and management of electronic dossiers submitted for evaluation; and
  • implementation of a strategy to increase consumer and health professional awareness of, and participation in, the adverse events reporting system.
Quantitative Deliverable
Number of Blueprint recommendations implemented
2013-14 Target
13
2013-14 Actual
9
Result
Substantially met
In 2013-14, the TGA implemented nine recommendations. Significant work was undertaken on five other recommendations which will be included in a broader reform package as part of the Government’s deregulation agenda in 2014-15. One recommendation planned for implementation in 2015-16 was implemented ahead of schedule in 2013-14.
At 30 June 2014, 37 of the 48 recommendations in the Blueprint have been implemented.
Qualitative Deliverable
The Department of Health will support industry to implement reforms that strengthen self-regulation of the promotion of therapeutic goods
2013-14 Reference Point
Shared information and complaints systems established by June 2014
Result
Substantially met
In 2013-14, the Department supported the Codes of Conduct Advisory Group, which was established to guide work on implementation of a number of reforms to industry’s self-regulatory framework for the promotion of therapeutic goods. A central complaints portal was designed, which will direct complaints about the promotion of therapeutic goods to industry associations’ individual complaints systems. The new complaints portal is expected to become operational in the second half of 2014.
Trans Tasman Harmonisation

In 2013-14, the Department continued working with the New Zealand Ministry of Health to progressively increase aspects of therapeutic product regulatory alignment between Australia and New Zealand. This alignment is consistent with international harmonisation objectives and the spirit of trans-Tasman cooperation and closer economic relations. As directed by the Prime Ministers of both countries, officials have also been reviewing developments in the therapeutics sector, both domestically and internationally, with a renewed focus on harmonisation, deregulation, streamlined market approvals and reducing costs to business. This is consistent with the Government’s focus on deregulation and reducing the cost of red tape for business, community organisations and individuals.

Qualitative Deliverable
Further progress a programme of work sharing and joint operations
2013-14 Reference Point
Commence public consultation on draft Health Rules by February 2014
Result
Not Met
In 2013-14, the TGA and New Zealand Medsafe commenced a further programme of regulatory harmonisation activities, consisting of 14 activities across six regulatory areas to be undertaken over a two year period. Two of the 14 activities have been completed – the Medicines Ingredients (Colours) and Medicines Safety (paediatric doses for paracetamol and ibuprofen) projects.

Industrial Chemicals

Aid in the protection of the Australian people and the environment by assessing the risks of industrial chemicals and providing information to promote their safe use

In 2013-14 the Department, through the National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS), continued to promote the safe use of industrial chemicals to protect human health and the environment.

Pre-market assessments were conducted for permits and certificates for the introduction of 327 new industrial chemicals, and the risks of 1,089 industrial chemicals already in use were reviewed. Many of these assessments resulted in risk management recommendations to protect the health of the Australian public, workers and the environment.

In November 2013, NICNAS conducted a survey of its stakeholders to inform continuous improvement in all NICNAS assessment, communication and compliance activities.

Qualitative Deliverable
Scientifically robust assessments of new and existing industrial chemicals
2013-14 Reference Point
Peer review and stakeholder feedback supports assessment outcomes
Result
Met
In 2013-14, assessment reports were published on the NICNAS website for 179 new chemicals and three priority existing chemicals. No applications were made for review of these chemical assessments by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT).
Qualitative Deliverable
High quality assessment outcomes are produced through effective use of the IMAP framework
2013-14 Reference Point
Stakeholder engagement and communication strategies effectively communicate assessment outcomes
Result
Met
The communication of all assessment findings is recognised as a crucial function of the IMAP programme. A range of communication tools has been used to inform stakeholders of the periodic release of assessments. In addition to direct liaison with interested national and international companies and peak stakeholder organisations, NICNAS also placed notices in issues of its electronic publications: the Chemical Gazette and NICNAS Matters.
Qualitative Deliverable
Contribution to the international harmonisation of regulatory approaches and methodologies for assessing industrial chemicals by reviewing Australian processes
2013-14 Reference Point
Review international regulatory approaches and methodologies from three key sub-committees of the OECD Chemicals Committee for their application to NICNAS assessments of industrial chemicals
Result
Met
In 2013-14, NICNAS represented Australia on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Chemicals Committee and its key chemical sub-committees (including the Task Force on Hazard Assessment, Task Force on Exposure Assessment, the Cooperative Chemicals Assessment Programme, the New Chemicals Clearing House, the Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials, and the OECD/UNEP Global PFC Steering Group).
NICNAS also represented Australia at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Chemicals Dialogue, and participated in the APEC Regulators Forum.
Qualitative Deliverable
All introducers of industrial chemicals are aware of their legal obligations
2013-14 Reference Point
Register identified introducers and provide regular information updates
Result
Met
As at the end of 2013-14, 99.87% of identified introducers were registered with NICNAS. The total number of registered introducers for 2013-14 was 5,465 representing the second highest total number of registrants since the introduction of NICNAS registration and the highest number of total registrants since 2005-06. Information sessions were delivered to over 300 attendees in major capital cities and regional areas.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of new chemical assessments completed within legislated timeframes
2013-14 Target
96%
2013-14 Actual
98%
Result
Met
In 2013-14, NICNAS completed 327 new chemical certificate and permit assessments, with 322 of these completed within legislated timeframes.
Quantitative KPI
Cumulative percentage of Stage One chemicals assessed through effective application of IMAP framework
2013-14 Target
50%
2013-14 Actual
56%
Result
Met
In 2013-14, 1,425 assessments for a total of 1,085 chemicals were published for public comment on the NICNAS website. These included 850 Tier II assessments.24 To date, NICNAS has assessed 1,808 chemicals, and made a total of 1,308 recommendations for amendments to existing regulatory controls or further assessment for 984 chemicals.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of those introducing over $500,000 of industrial chemicals assessed for compliance with new chemicals obligations
2013-14 Target
35%
2013-14 Actual
35%
Result
Met
Qualitative KPI
Effective use of international information
2013-14 Reference Point
For new chemicals: incorporate available international hazard assessment information into assessments. For existing chemicals: provide guidance and training on the use of international information to assessors implementing the IMAP framework
Result
Met
International information has been effectively utilised by scientific assessors as a result of the implementation of NICNAS’ Science Strategy, which outlines key priorities for building NICNAS’ scientific capacity. Scientific assessors received ongoing professional development from experts in the field. This included application of computational models and assessment methodologies, such as quantitative structure–activity relationship models (QSAR models) and Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS).

Gene Technology Regulation

Protect the health and safety of people and the environment by regulating dealings with genetically modified organisms

The Gene Technology Regulator, supported by the Office of the Gene Technology Regulator (OGTR), administers a national scheme for the regulation of gene technology to protect the health and safety of people and the environment by regulating certain activities with genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

In 2013-14, the OGTR implemented the revised Risk Analysis Framework that was launched in June 2013, and continued to monitor advances in scientific knowledge and developments in regulatory practice to ensure the assessments required under the gene technology legislation were robust, based on current science and represented international best practice.

The OGTR implemented operational recommendations arising from the response of all Australian Governments to the 2011 Review of the Gene Technology Act 2000. In addition, OGTR reviewed guidelines and processes, in consultation with stakeholders, to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the gene technology regulatory system. OGTR also engaged in international cooperation to promote harmonisation of risk assessment of GMOs.

Qualitative Deliverable
Implement changes to OGTR operations agreed by the all Australian Governments’ response to the Review of the Gene Technology Act 2000
2013-14 Reference Point
Implementation completed within any agreed timeframes set in the response
Result
Met
In 2013-14, the OGTR implemented operational recommendations from the 2011 Review of the Gene Technology Act 2000. This included a range of activities to improve communication and consultation with regulated stakeholders and the public. Engagement with stakeholders is an ongoing priority for OGTR.
Qualitative Deliverable
Provide open, transparent and effective regulation of GMOs
2013-14 Reference Point
Stakeholders, including the public, consulted on all assessments for proposed release of GMOs into the environment. Record of GMOs and maps of all field trial sites maintained and made publicly available on OGTR website.
Risk assessments and risk management plans prepared for all applications for licenced dealings
Result
Met
In 2013-14, the Regulator prepared comprehensive risk assessments and risk management plans and consulted with stakeholders on seven GMO licence applications for intentional release into the environment (five field/clinical trials and two general/commercial releases). The Regulator also prepared risk assessments and risk management plans for 10 licence applications for work in contained facilities. The OGTR maintained a record of approved GMOs and maps of all field trial sites, and made them available on the OGTR website.25
In addition, the OGTR continued bilateral arrangements with other Australian Government regulators to enhance coordinated decision making and avoid duplication in regulation of GMOs and genetically modified products.
Qualitative KPI
Facilitate cooperation and prevent duplication in the implementation of GMO regulation
2013-14 Reference Point
High degree of cooperation with relevant regulatory agencies
Result
Met
In 2013-14, the OGTR continued cooperative arrangements with other Australian Government regulators to enhance coordinated decision making and avoid duplication in regulation of GMOs and genetically modified products.
The OGTR also engaged in international forums focussing on harmonisation of risk assessment and regulation of GMOs including with the OECD, WHO and Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety; and hosted a workshop on International Regulatory Challenges in Gene Technology involving regulatory agency representatives from US, Canada and Europe.
Quantitative Deliverable
Percentage of field trial sites and higher level containment facilities inspected
2013-14 Target
≥20%
2013-14 Actual
40% and 25%
Result
Met
In 2013-14, the OGTR inspected 40% of field trial sites to monitor compliance with licence conditions ensuring risks to human health and the environment are minimised. Sites were inspected in the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia. Inspections included genetically modified canola, wheat, barley, cotton, sugarcane, banana, safflower, and a clinical trial of genetically modified viral vaccines intended to provide protection against prostate cancer.
The OGTR also inspected 25% of higher level containment facilities to ensure compliance with certification conditions. These inspections focused on the integrity of the physical structure of the facility and on the general laboratory practices followed.
Quantitative KPI
Percentage of licence decisions made within statutory timeframes
2013-14 Target
100%
2013-14 Actual
100%
Result
Met
The Regulator made decisions on all licence applications within the applicable statutory timeframes, as in previous reporting periods. There were no appeals of decisions made under the gene technology legislation.
Qualitative KPI
Protect people and the environment through identification and management of risks from GMOs
2013-14 Reference Point
High level of compliance with the gene technology legislation and no adverse effect on human health or environment from GMOs
Result
Met
Routine monitoring of the regulated community found a high level of compliance with the gene technology legislation.

Programme 1.5: Immunisation

Programme 1.5 aims to strengthen immunisation coverage and improve the efficiency of the National Immunisation Program (NIP).

Strengthen immunisation coverage

Australia has high rates of immunisation, with more than 90 per cent of children fully immunised. In 2013-14, the Department continued to provide free vaccines to eligible Australians through the NIP.

In 2013-14, the Department introduced two new combination vaccines to the NIP, the combined measles, mumps, rubella, varicella (MMRV) vaccine and the combined Haemophilus influenzae type b-meningococcal C (Hib-MenC) vaccine. These combination vaccines have reduced the number of immunisations required under the childhood schedule.

High immunisation rates were recorded in 2013-14 with more than 90.4 per cent of children in the age groups of one, two and five years fully immunised. Compared to 2012-13 there was a slight drop for one year old children, maintained for two year old children and an increase for five year old children. While national rates are high, there remain some pockets of low immunisation coverage which may compromise immunity in those communities. For example, rates of parents registering their objection to immunisation range from close to 0 per cent to over 7 per cent in some regions. The Department will be working with States and Territories, through the National Partnership Agreement on Essential Vaccines (NPEV), and with immunisation providers, to increase immunisation rates. This work will align with priorities under the National Immunisation Strategy.

Figure 1.1: Immunisation coverage – proportion of children fully immunised, by age, and Indigenous status, 2004-2014

The figure is a horizontal line chart with a y-axis showing the percentage of Indigenous children and all children fully immunised in the age groups of 12-15 months; 24-27 months; and 60-63 months between the years 2004-2012 (represented on the x-axis). The chart shows that over the past decade, there has been a steady increase in the immunisation coverage rates for Indigenous children across all the above mentioned age groups.

A review of the NPEV completed in June 2014 found the Commonwealth and States and Territories had provided effective funding and delivery of a national, coordinated and integrated approach to maintaining and improving immunisation in Australia. Several key findings of the review will drive the development of a revised partnership agreement in 2014-15 with the aim of further improving Australia’s already high immunisation rates.

Quantitative KPI
Maintain the immunisation coverage rates among children 12–15 months of age
2013-14 Target
91.8%
2013-14 Actual
90.4%
Result
Substantially met
The immunisation coverage rates among children 12–15 months of age: 2010-11 91.5 per cent, 2011-12 91.8 per cent, 2012-13 91.3 per cent Immunisation rates in 2013-14 continued to be high with the national immunisation rate for children aged 12-15 months at 90.4%.
Quantitative KPI
Maintain the immunisation coverage rates among children 24-27 months of age
2013-14 Target
92.7%
2013-14 Actual
92.4%
Result
Substantially met
The immunisation coverage rates among children 24-27 months of age: 2010-11 91.9 per cent, 2011-12 92.6 per cent, 2012-13 92.4 per cent Immunisation rates in 2013-14 continued to be high with the national immunisation rate for children aged 24-27 months at 92.4%.
Quantitative KPI
Improve the immunisation coverage rates among children 60-63 months of age
2013-14 Target
90.0%
2013-14 Actual
92.0%
Result
Met
The immunisation coverage rates among children 60-63 months of age: 2010-11 89.2 per cent, 2011-12 90 per cent, 2012-13 91.5 per cent Immunisation rates in 2013-14 continued to be high with the national immunisation rate for children aged 60-63 months at 92.0%.
Qualitative KPI
States and Territories meet requirements of the National Partnership Agreement on Essential Vaccines
2013-14 Reference Point
The performance benchmarks are used to assess State and Territory performance and consist of:
  • maintaining or increasing vaccine coverage for Indigenous Australians
  • maintaining or increasing coverage in agreed areas of low immunisation coverage
  • maintaining or decreasing wastage and leakage
  • maintaining or increasing vaccination coverage for four year olds
Result
Met
All states and territories met benchmarks required by the NPEV and were eligible to receive reward payments.26
Influenza

In 2014, the Department saw an increase in demand from those eligible to receive free influenza vaccination under the NIP, similar to that experienced in 2013. More than 4.33 million doses of influenza vaccine were ordered by States and Territories. There was also increased demand for influenza vaccine for the private market. The Department has worked closely with vaccine providers to ensure enough influenza vaccine is available for those most at risk of severe influenza.

Since 2011, bioCSL’s influenza vaccine Fluvax® has not been approved by the TGA for use in children under five years of age. This followed adverse reactions in children in 2010. However, a small number of GPs and immunisation providers continue to administer the bioCSL Fluvax® influenza vaccine to children under five years of age. In 2014, the Department continued to implement measures to address this issue. Incorrect vaccine usage was monitored through the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) to promptly identify and follow-up providers. The number of children incorrectly given the vaccine dropped to 44 in the 2013 season, down from 115 a year earlier, with an increase in notifications of administration of influenza vaccines to this age group from 19,765 in 2012 to 63,914 in 2014 (to end of June 2014).

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

The HPV vaccine coverage rate for Australian girls aged 15 years who have received all three doses is 70.9 per cent. This coverage rate has remained steady since 2009 and is amongst the best in the world.

In February 2013, the National HPV Vaccination Program was extended to males aged 12-13 years, with males aged 14-15 years eligible to receive the free HPV vaccine as part of a two year catch-up programme ending in 2014. Male coverage achieved in the first year of the programme is being collected with early indicators that coverage will be approximately 5-10 per cent lower than for the female programme. This is a great achievement for the first year of programme delivery for males. Male uptake is expected to increase over the coming years.

There has been a decline in the prevalence of HPV types in cervical smear specimens for young females who had been fully vaccinated prior to their first smear test, with a 46 per cent risk reduction in high grade cervical abnormalities and a further 34 per cent risk reduction in other cervical abnormalities.27 In time, this should translate into a reduction in HPV-related cancers and ultimately a reduction in the burden of illness and death due to cervical cancer.

National Immunisation Strategy

The National Immunisation Strategy 2013-18 builds on the past successes of the NIP and identifies the following eight key strategic priority areas aimed at strengthening the NIP:

  • improve immunisation coverage;
  • ensure effective governance of the NIP;
  • ensure secure vaccine supply and efficient use of vaccines for the NIP;
  • continue to enhance vaccine safety monitoring systems;
  • maintain and ensure community confidence in the NIP through effective communication strategies;
  • strengthen monitoring and evaluation of the NIP through assessment and analysis of immunisation register data and vaccine-preventable diseases surveillance;
  • ensure an adequate skilled immunisation workforce through promoting effective training for immunisation providers; and
  • maintain Australia’s strong contribution to the region.
Qualitative Deliverable
The priority actions contained in the National Immunisation Strategy are being undertaken
2013-14 Reference Point
Implement priority actions in accordance with timeframes set out in the National Immunisation Strategy
Result
Met
The National Immunisation Strategy was endorsed by the Standing Council on Health (now known as the COAG Health Council) in November 2013. The Department has commenced implementing the Strategy in collaboration with State and Territory Governments and key stakeholders. Initial areas of focus include improving immunisation coverage; strengthening the monitoring and evaluation of the NIP; and maintaining community confidence in the NIP.
A number of priority actions have been implemented. These include a review of the National Vaccine Storage Guidelines, Strive for 5; improved vaccine safety monitoring systems arising from the Review of the management of adverse events associated with Panvax and Fluvax; improved access to immunisation data for research purposes; and the updating and dissemination of various communication materials for health professionals and consumers.
Qualitative Deliverable
Develop and disseminate information for health professionals, providers and consumers on immunisation programmes
2013-14 Reference Point
Develop resources for immunisation providers to assist them in communicating with parents who are hesitant to immunise their children
Public release of additional immunisation data to increase transparency and assist targeted immunisation activities by programme managers
Result
Met
In 2013-14, the Department continued to develop and disseminate information for health professionals, providers and consumers regarding immunising children with vaccines under the NIP schedule.

Improve the efficiency of the National Immunisation Program

In 2010-11 a review of the management of adverse events associated with Panvax® and Fluvax® was undertaken following a number of children experiencing adverse reactions. All seven recommendations of the review have been substantially implemented, including the establishment of the TGA’s Advisory Committee on the Safety of Vaccines (ACSOV) in March 2013, and improved vaccines safety monitoring systems.

The ACSOV continues to advise the Department on vaccine safety matters associated with the NIP. In 2013-14, the Department funded a range of projects to undertake active surveillance of adverse events following immunisation of specific vaccines. These projects are expected to confirm the safety profile of those vaccines and to date, no vaccine safety signals have been identified.

During 2013-14, the Department substantially revised the format of vaccine contracts to streamline future vaccine procurement processes and reduce the administrative burden on industry, States and Territories and the Department.

Quantitative Deliverable
Number of completed tenders under the National Partnership Agreement on Essential Vaccines (Essential Vaccines Procurement Strategy)
2013-14 Target
2
2013-14 Actual
0
Result
Not met
The Department continues to transition to centralised purchasing arrangements. Two tenders for the supply of pneumococcal vaccine, one for the infant cohort and one for the older cohort were released in the fourth quarter of 2013-14. The tenders are nearing completion with tender finalisation anticipated by October 2014.
Further national tender processes will be undertaken in 2014-15 for vaccines under the NIP and in accordance with the Essential Vaccine Procurement Strategy, which can be found on the Immunise Australia website.28

Programme 1.6: Public health

Programme 1.6 aims to increase the health of the public through a range of targeted health programmes.

Increase the evidence base for the development of targeted health programmes

The Department continues to gather information through several national health surveys to ensure that health programmes and policies are based on strong evidence of the health issues affecting the community. This includes the Australian Health Survey (AHS) undertaken by the Australian Bureau of Statistics in close consultation with the Department; the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health (ALSMH); and the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH).

Qualitative Deliverable
Undertake the AHS
2013-14 Reference Point
More detailed results from the general population survey to be released in 2013-14, including physical activity data, biomedical measurements and nutrition data
High level results for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander AHS are due to be released in September 2013, with more detailed results released from June 2014
Result
Met
Results from the AHS were released throughout 2013-14:29 physical activity results were released in July 2013, biomedical results for chronic diseases in August 2013, biomedical results for nutrients in December 2013, and dietary intake results in May 2014.
Qualitative Deliverable
Undertake the ALSMH and the ALSWH
2013-14 Reference Point
ALSMH: Initial reporting from Wave 1 will be completed by December 2013. Revision of instrumentation for Wave 2 will be completed by June 2014
ALSWH: Final reporting on data from Survey 6 of the 1973-1978 cohort will be completed by December 2013
Result
Substantially met
ALSMH: Deadlines for Wave 1 and Wave 2 were extended to provide additional time to recruit a sufficient cohort of participants.
ALSWH: Data collection and reporting undertaken as planned. The seventh ALSWH major report Health and Wellbeing of Women Aged 18-23 in 2013 and 1996 was completed and released.30
Qualitative KPI
Strengthened evidence base to inform targeted health policy and programmes activities
2013-14 Reference Point
Results from the AHS, ALSWH and ALSMH increase the amount of information available to researchers and policy makers
Result
Substantially met
Results from the AHS for the general and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations are available to inform health policy and programmes, and will be complemented by further releases as results become available.
The next National Health Survey will commence early in 2014-15. The results will enable the analysis of recent health programmes, and monitoring of trends in risk factors and health conditions over time.

Improve child and youth health

The Department continues to work with States and Territories to develop meaningful guidelines and frameworks to strengthen services and improve child and youth health.

Qualitative Deliverable
Completion of the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Antenatal Care
2013-14 Reference Point
Module Two of the Guidelines (covering the second and third trimesters of pregnancy) will be completed by early 2014
Result
Not met
The Clinical Practice Guidelines for Antenatal Care – Module Two, are expected to be completed in late 2014-early 2015. The process for seeking approval of these guidelines has taken longer than anticipated. As at July 2014, they had been approved by the NHMRC. Following Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council (AHMAC) clearance, the guidelines will be published on the Department’s website.
Qualitative KPI
Delivery of health services for children in out-of-home care is consistent, evidence-based and appropriate
2013-14 Reference Point
State and Territory Governments report on the successful implementation of the National Clinical Assessment Framework for Children in Out-of-Home care
Result
Met

Promote healthy lifestyle choices

The Department continues to develop and promote policies which encourage healthy lifestyle choices, including healthy eating and physical activity.

Quantitative Deliverable
Number of grants to local governments administered through the Healthy Communities Initiative31
2013-14 Target
92
2013-14 Actual
92
Result
Met
The Healthy Communities Initiative provided funding to 92 local government areas to deliver effective community-based physical activity and healthy eating programmes, and to develop a range of local policies that support healthy lifestyle behaviours.

Improve men’s and women’s health

A range of innovative programmes – many of them lifestyle related – are contributing to the health and wellbeing of Australian men and women.

Qualitative KPI
Health services targeting the health of men, or women, are relevant to their needs and preferences
2013-14 Reference Point
The scope and objectives of programmes funded by the Australian Government targeting male health or women’s health are informed by the National Male Health and National Women’s Health policies (as appropriate)
Result
Met
The Australian Government funds a range of programmes informed by the National Women’s Health Policy. These include: the Family Planning Program for women’s sexual and reproductive health; and education and research in specific areas of women’s health. Activities in support of men’s health include funding for men’s sheds activities and support for organisations to develop collaborative strategies to raise awareness of male reproductive health disorders and their associations with chronic disease.

Outcome 1 – Financial Resource Summary

(A)
Budget Estimate 1 2013-14
$’000
(B)
Actual 2013-14
$’000
Variation
(Column B minus Column A)
$’000
Programme 1.1: Chronic Disease – Early Detection and Prevention
Administered Expenses
Ordinary Annual Services (Annual Appropriation Bill 1)
126,531
114,417
( 12,114)
Departmental Expenses
Departmental Appropriation 2
16,305
15,553
( 752)
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the current year 3
751
746
( 5)
Total for Programme 1.1
143,587
130,716
( 12,871)
Programme 1.2: Communicable Disease Control
Administered Expenses
Ordinary Annual Services (Annual Appropriation Bill 1)
19,826
15,345
( 4,481)
Departmental Expenses
Departmental Appropriation 2
5,384
5,709
325
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the current year 3
270
273
3
Total for Programme 1.2
25,480
21,327
( 4,153)
Programme 1.3: Drug Strategy
Administered Expenses
Ordinary Annual Services (Annual Appropriation Bill 1)
201,623
190,901
( 10,722)
Departmental Expenses
Departmental Appropriation 2
21,100
22,095
995
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the current year 3
1,044
1,069
25
Total for Programme 1.3
223,767
214,065
( 9,702)
Programme 1.4: Regulatory Policy
Administered Expenses
Ordinary Annual Services (Annual Appropriation Bill 1)
2,517
1,968
( 549)
Departmental Expenses
Departmental Appropriation 2
26,831
26,184
( 647)
to Special Accounts
( 13,310)
( 13,160)
150
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the current year 3
608
572
( 36)
Special Accounts
OGTR Special Account
8,142
7,961
( 181)
NICNAS Special Account
15,068
12,887
( 2,181)
TGA Special Account
137,334
130,334
( 7,000)
Expense adjustment 4
( 3,637)
3,565
7,202
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the current year 2
12
12
Total for Programme 1.4
173,553
170,323
( 3,230)
Programme 1.5: Immunisation
Administered Expenses
Ordinary Annual Services (Annual Appropriation Bill 1)
20,515
19,228
( 1,287)
to Australian Childhood Immunisation Register
Special Account
( 5,747)
( 5,747)
Special appropriations
National Health Act – 1953 – essential vaccines
134,994
135,374
380
Special Accounts
Australian Childhood Immunisation Register Special Account
9,388
9,291
( 97)
Departmental Expenses
Departmental Appropriation 2
7,456
6,971
( 485)
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the current year 3
376
336
( 40)
Total for Programme 1.5
166,982
165,453
( 1,529)
Programme 1.6: Public Health
Administered Expenses
Ordinary Annual Services (Annual Appropriation Bill 1)
12,312
10,379
( 1,933)
Other Services (Annual Appropriation Bill 2)
11,058
10,651
( 407)
Departmental Expenses
Departmental Appropriation 2
8,413
8,831
418
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the current year 3
415
425
10
Total for Programme 1.6
32,198
30,286
( 1,912)
Outcome 1 Totals by appropriation type
Administered Expenses
Ordinary Annual Services (Annual Appropriation Bill 1)
383,324
352,238
( 31,086)
to Special Accounts
( 5,747)
( 5,747)
Other Services (Annual Appropriation Bill 2)
11,058
10,651
( 407)
Special appropriations
134,994
135,374
380
Special Accounts
9,388
9,291
( 97)
Departmental Expenses
Departmental Appropriation 2
85,489
85,343
( 146)
to Special Accounts
( 13,310)
( 13,160)
150
Expenses not requiring appropriation in the current year 3
3,464
3,421
( 43)
Special Accounts
156,907
154,759
( 2,148)
Total Expenses for Outcome 1
765,567
732,170
( 33,397)
Average Staffing Level (Number)
1,266
1,266

1 Budgeted appropriations taken from the 2014-15 Health Portfolio Budget Statements and re-aligned to the 2013-14 programme group structure.

2 Departmental appropriation combines ‘Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill 1)’ and ‘Revenue from independent sources (s31)’.

3 ‘Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year’ is made up of depreciation expense, amortisation, make good expense and audit fees. This estimate also includes approved operating losses – please refer to the departmental financial statements for further information. Some reclassifications have been made to the Budget estimates to more accurately reflect the allocation of departmental depreciation by outcome.

4 Special Accounts are reported on a cash basis. The adjustment reflets the difference between cash and expenses.

In this section